Morning Briefing, 17th January

Cork City is to get a new Central Library (Cork City Council) Wooo!

RTÉ viewers choose our song for the Eurovision last night. Its a John Waters/ Tommy Moran composition called ‘They can’t stop the Spring’.

The PD’s continue their conference today (Breakingnews, RTÉ) Among the guest speakers are Liam Doran of the Irish Nurses Organisation and Anne-mie Neyts, President of the European Liberal Democrats.

A Bosnian Court has sentenced a former Serb soldier to 34 years in jail for killing, enslaving and raping Muslim civilians during the country’s 1992-1995 war (France 24)

Proposed reforms of the Irish Criminal System are to be discussed by experts at an ICCL Forum (Breakingnews)

Lesotho goes to the polls today in a tight race for power (CNN)

$10 billion has been squandered by the U.S. government on Iraq reconstruction aid because of contractor overcharges and unsupported expenses (CNN) What a waste of money! All the people that it could be helping

What is a ‘tiger’ kidnapping

I’ve been hear the words ‘tiger’ kidnapping alot lately (at first i thought a tiger had been kidnapped or something) but i looking it up i found the following defination, and it explains it perfectly for me!

tiger kidnapping n. the abduction or holding of a hostage to persuade another person to aid in a crime.

Source, Doubled-Tongued Dictionary

Well that is that one sorted.

Another word used alot in Greys Anatomy is “Candy Strppin'”

Heres what it is!

A candy striper was traditionally a young, female hospital volunteer; a concept that originated in the 1940s. The unique job title represented the candy cane look of the red and white-striped pinafores worn by the volunteers. Traditionally, the girls sewed their own pinafores. East Orange General Hospital in New Jersey claims to have started the first candy striper program in 1944.

During the 1950s and 60s, the popularity of candy stripers was widespread. In general, the goal of a candy striper was to make a patient’s stay in the hospital more pleasant. Initially, a candy striper simply delivered mail or patient meals, but as nurses became overburdened, the volunteers took on additional duties. Now, a candy striper might help feed, or read to, a patient; assist as a patient is discharged; or deliver messages. Other duties include transporting book or video carts to patient rooms.

Much has changed in candy striping over the years. In the early years, the training to be a candy striper lasted months, but now most hospitals train the volunteers in a few days. Currently there are male candy stripers; although most hospitals have a higher percentage of young female volunteers than males. “Volunteer” is the more likely term used to refer to a candy striper nowadays, and the uniform is not likely the red and white jumper of years past.

Most hospitals accept volunteers aged 13-18 for candy striping. Hospital volunteers perform a variety of duties, which may include staffing reception areas and gift shops; filing documents; or transporting medical records, lab specimens, and drugs from unit to unit. A candy striper might also assist with cleaning duties in a hospital. In some instances, volunteers only complete clerical tasks, due to insurance liability.

A candy striper program is an excellent introduction to the field of health care. Students who are interested in the medical field often find volunteering or job shadowing at a hospital beneficial. The hospital arranges the volunteer’s schedule and the candy striper reports to a volunteer coordinator, nurse or physician.

Most hospitals require potential candy stripers to complete an application and interview session, and to provide character references and parental consent to volunteer. Other requirements include a TB skin test and physical exam. Once a young applicant is accepted as a volunteer, he or she will likely be required to wear a uniform and ID badge, observe all medical center policies, and maintain excellent conduct.


Source, WiseGEEK

Any words you have that others mighten know?

1st of January what a busy day!

I recently posted about what will happen to Slovenia, Bulgaria and Romania on the 1st of January 2007, but that’s not all that will happen.

The EU institutions will be able to work in Irish from now on, that includes Irish MEP’s addressing the EU Parliament as Gaeilge and the EU publishing more documents in Irish.

Also on the 1st of January ASBO’s will be introduced in Ireland, these arent been welcomed by all though. Youth groups are opposed to them as there is no oversight on them, which is an issue.

One thing for certain, it looks like Saddam wont be alive to see in the new year.

Tánaiste finally accepts Garda lack of resources after years of denial

FG electronic tagging proposals would have put Marlo’s 23 associates under 24 hour monitoringJustice Minister Michael McDowell has made a complete U-turn on Garda resourcing today by suddenly publishing an uncosted package of crime proposals (Tuesday), only days after he insisted that resourcing was not an issue, according to Fine Gael Justice Spokesman Jim O’Keeffe TD.

‘The problem of Garda resources is not a new one, but the Tánaiste is only now waking up to the scale of the problem. Fine Gael has been demanding increases in Garda equipment and manpower for years. Only last Sunday the Minister announced that Garda resourcing was not an issue, but the Minister has now undergone a miraculous Pauline conversion. Much of this proposed new spending is not contained in the Department of Justice’s Estimates for 2007, most notably the increase in the Garda Reserve and ‘unlimited’ investment in the Witness Protection Scheme. However, he has failed to put the Witness Protection Scheme on a statutory basis and it will continue its steady decline.

‘The most newsworthy element of the Minister’s ‘new’ proposals is that they closely mirror Fine Gael and Labour’s joint policing policy launched this week. The Minister has adopted Fine Gael’s proposals to further increase policing numbers, but has failed to make provision for future expansion in line with demographic changes. He has also followed Fine Gael’s lead on the need for more civilianisation. Last April I identified that 225 Garda positions in human resources, IT and the Garda Press Office could be civilianised overnight. Why did Michael McDowell wait so long before taking action? And why has he so consistently rubbished this idea, only to finally accept it?

‘The Minister is doing nothing to strengthen the bail laws, is making no provision for the Special Criminal Court to try lethal criminals, and has no plans to beef up the Criminal Assets Bureau. The Minister has rowed back on his criticism of the judiciary and will not accept Fine Gael’s common sense proposal to electronically tag persons on bail, which would have provided 24 hour surveillance of lethal criminals, including the 23 associates of the murdered ganglord Martin ‘Marlo’ Hyland.

‘Fine Gael will publish a schedule of offences that the DPP must consider for prosecution in the Special Criminal Court, increase the powers and the spread of the CAB, allow the DPP to appeal bail more readily, bring in new legislation for a statutory witness protection programme, and take a firm stand on organised and gangland crime the way we did in the aftermath of the murder of Veronica Guerin when last we were in Government.

‘The Fianna Fáil/PD Government has lost the plot on crime, changing its policies on a weekly basis, lacking any new initiatives, and refusing to implement sensible and effective opposition proposals. In the absence of any conviction for gangland crime since John Gilligan, Michael McDowell has yet to claim any significant victory against crime as Minister for Justice. Perhaps he should go back to the Law Library where his record is not so shameful.’