An bhfuil Bród agat?

Tonight while visiting the parents I stumbled upon Bernard Dunne’s Bród Club on RTE One. The was random in itself as my parents were in Lisvernane, Co. Tipperary who won TG4’s G-Team last Friday (aired Sunday on TG4) at the weekend and had been talking about the language. While I am far from fluent in Gaeilge Bródclub and the conversation on G-Team has managed to get me back thinking about how I use the cupla focal myself.

I mainly use it in my own head or when alone! Its not that I am embarrassed or neirbhiseach, but I simple don’t use it in public. But that is going to change!

I have signed up to Bród Club and I have pledged to use my cúpla focail. The campaign is to encourage everyone to use their cupla focail and they hope to get 100,00 people signed up!

I’ve dug out the Foclóir Póca and the Buntas Cainte to remind me of the words I do know and using the Bród Club website to find ways of using it with the weekly ask!

So why not sign up? Follow on Twitter, and like on Facebook?

Show bród in your language! Sign up and have spraoi le gaeilge!

YFG to call on the Government to implement its election promise?

Young Fine Gael
Image via Wikipedia

More of the motions from the Young Fine Gael next weekend have been released and Wexford YFG have one calling on the Government to implement one of Fine Gael’s pre-election policies on the Irish Language. The motion reads

YFG calls on FG to live up to its election promise and removes Irish as a compulsory subject in the Leaving Certificate

The relevant part of the Fine Gael manifesto reads as follows

Fine Gael is committed to overhauling the way in which Irish is taught at primary and second levels of education, to ensure teachers are equipped with the right tools to instil a love of the language for all students and the curriculum is designed to inspire students to continue speaking the language after leaving school.

• We will overhaul the curriculum at second level and we will critically examine the effect of current training methods of teachers to teach. Irish as an optional subject for Leaving Certificate will only apply following consultations on both matters.

• We will allocate 50% of marks to oral Irish exams.

• We aim to double the proportion of Irish students sitting the Higher Level Leaving Certificate exam by 2018.

This is sure to get a big debate going on Saturday morning. The Irish Language policy caused a lot of division in the grassroots of Fine Gael and Young Fine Gael and is an issue that can regularly be heard debated in YFG/FG social events.

While I am all for a revision of the curriculum on Irish and in fact think it should be split into two subjects, Conversational and Literature. This should stop the learning by rote which is endemic in the learning of Irish, but should it be compulsory is a tough one.

Motions to be discussed at YFG Conference 2012

  • YFG proposes that an incentive for young farmers be introduced by increasing the number of training places in agricultural colleges – Laois YFG
  • YFG approves of the process of fracking as can it can prove a viable energy source in Ireland for the foreseeable future – UCD YFG
  • YFG proposes that the 1989 Incitement of Hatred Act be updated to include provisions relating to social media and social networking – Kilkenny YFG
  • YFG believes that a graduate tax should be introduced for all college graduates as a means of funding their education and the present entry fees should be phased out over 5 years. Households with an income of below €45,000 would be exempted – UCC YFG
  • YFG believes that it is imperative that the ECB renegotiates the current promissory note structure with the Government. It is in the best interests of the Irish economy, the ECB, the Euro and the European Union that the structure of the promissory notes system is changed. Failure to do so will create an unsustainable debt burden for Ireland, causing huge barriers to job creation and restricting growth in the Irish economy – YFG National Executive
  • Young Fine Gael strongly supports Ireland’s membership of the euro and the efforts of EU Government to stabilise the eurozone, and; calls on the Government to engage with other EU member states to implement real and lasting reform of the EU treaties and institutions to ensure that the dangerous political paralysis of the last two years can never be repeated. – Alfie Byrne YFG
  • YFG calls on FG to live up to its election promise and removes Irish as a compulsory subject in the Leaving Certificate – Wexford YFG
  • YFG call on the government to bring forward legislation allowing gay couples to adopt – DCU YFG
YFG proposes that an incentive for young farmers be introduced by
increasing the number of training places in agricultural colleges – Laois
YFG
YFG approves of the process of fracking as can it can prove a viable energy
source in Ireland for the foreseeable future – UCD YFG
YFG proposes that the 1989 Incitement of Hatred Act be updated to include
provisions relating to social media and social networking – Kilkenny YFG
YFG believes that a graduate tax should be introduced for all college
graduates as a means of funding their education and the present entry fees
should be phased out over 5 years. Households with an income of below
€45,000 would be exempted – UCC YFG
YFG believes that it is imperative that the ECB renegotiates the current
promissory note structure with the Government. It is in the best interests
of the Irish economy, the ECB, the Euro and the European Union that the
structure of the promissory notes system is changed. Failure to do so will
create an unsustainable debt burden for Ireland, causing huge barriers to
job creation and restricting growth in the Irp9olk,m ish economy – YFG
National Executive
Young Fine Gael strongly supports Ireland’s membership of the euro and the
efforts of EU Government to stabilise the eurozone, and; calls on the
Government to engage with other EU member states to implement real and
lasting reform of the EU treaties and institutions to ensure that the
dangerous political paralysis of the last two years can never be repeated.
– Alfie Byrne YFG
YFG calls on FG to live up to its election promise and removes Irish as a
compulsory subject in the Leaving Certificate – Wexford YFG
YFG call on the government to bring forward legislation allowing gay
couples to adopt – DCU YFG

My Speech

EU Flag + Gay UK
Image by stephen.spillane via Flickr

As you are probably aware, I gave a speech at the Alliance Francaise/UCC European Symposium on “European CItizenship”. My speech was on National Identities withing European Identity and Culture. I got great feedback on the speech so I decided to share it with you.

Presidents, Excellencies, Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen,

What am I? Irish or European? When I go abroad, I rarely get told I am Irish, well that is until I open my mouth, but even at that they can get confused to where I am from within Ireland. So for me this idea of being European is a natural definition of my identity.

But am I alone in this feeling? Is it only because I don’t have an Irish accent and my sallow skin, that I think this or is it there something else, something deeper?

Recently a number of us in the European Bloggersphere managed to have a bit of an identity crisis, so I am not alone in this feeling. Younger generations, I think are feeling more European. But is it because we are growing up in a Europe that is a lot closer to us and the fact we learn more about Europe in School. Or is it as some would say it is thanks to ease of international travel with Ryanair and other low-cost airlines and the fact that the internet can bring places closer to us. We can chat to people in other countries easily online with new technologies. But is it just traveling and technology that is bringing us closer or is there something more, something more basic, something deeper that unites us.

Some argue, though that being European is “aspirational”. Conor Slowey sums this up quite well on his blog “The European Citizen” when he said “When I think of Europe, I think of its diversity and its languages and its traditions, and I want to travel, explore and experience all of the little differences, while I still feel at home. To me it’s not rootless cosmopolitanism, but a deep appreciation for many roots and a desire to feel a part of the different places and people that I meet.”

Coming back to identity, national identies though are social constructs, they are formed by what we see around us, by our expeirences and by what matters to us. My church recently sent around a questionaire on identity, it seems to be all the rage lately, and it gave the following options for describing an identity:

  • Class
  • Religous Denomination
  • Nationality
  • Political Beliefs
  • Race
  • Gender

Of those only two would mean something to me as part of my identity, the others would not mean much to me. A big issue of course with identity, is some parts of it you have very little choice over, for example if we take the list the church gave only of two of those can be changed some what easily, Religous Denomination and Political Beliefs. The rest is decided at birth. Granted class can change over time depending on circumstances but you can’t decide in the moring you will become Upper Class, while you can wake up in the morning and decide to vote for a different party in future.

There is an interesting excercise around identity in non-formal education. Basically you draw a flower and on each of the petals write one thing that describes your identity. I did this on a Anna Lindh Training Programme and it was very interesting and you would surprise yourself with what you would come up with. I know the first thing I wrote down was European, the second was Irish.

That is not new for me though. I can remember having conversations in secondary school about this with friends, and I am sure I was definately then in the minority that thought myself European first and Irish second. I still think that way today, as that excercise showed.

I don’t think national identity and European identity are mutually exclusive, being European to me means that I am broad minded, that I speak more then one language, that I have expeirenced life in another country, I start counting with my thumb, that I have expeirenced Europe. That is a very personal definition, because I have friends that haven’t lived outside of Ireland and feel as European as I do. European Identity is a very personal thing, just as with Irish Identity people put different emphasis on different things. To some being Irish is all about the language, to others its the traditions, to others its the sport. There is no single Irish Identity, while all these do come together to form the Irish Culture.

Identity is a personal thing, no one can impose one on you, unless you let them. In one sense sterotyping is trying to force an identity on someone. For example when I say I am Irish, people think “party” and “drinking”, but there is more to me then just partying and drinking. So I always try to define myself by actions, that is how we take control over our identity.

So Irish Identity feeds into European Identity. By saying I am European is not saying I am less Irish, but there is this European aspect to me, which influences how I react, what I say and what I do. It influences how I approach problems, how I deal with friends and how I behave. It isn’t this thing that suddenly appeared thanks to the Maastricht Treaty which gave us rights as European Citizens.

These rights that were given to us under the Treaties and which have expanded under subsequent treaties. These have not changed how European I feel, but I think they have helped in increasing the feeling for others.

Identity is something that is fluid, that it changes over time, that it can expand with new experiences, and that who you are can change. Being European is something, not to aspire to, but to be in your own way. Again we have no choice in our identity, but we do have control over what makes up the important parts of our identity, to me that is what I have learned, my experiences, my loves, my dislikes, and my friendships. In a year in which we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the dismantling of the Berlin Wall I leave you with the words of a German Blogger, Julien Frisch,

“Today, I live in a Union that opens its borders internally but is closed down to the world outside its own borders. 20 years after the Wall – the material representation of the division of Europe – was torn down, Europe is still divided. There are those who are in . And those who are not.

As a former East German, I will continue to fight against these borders, because I want to share what I received, not least because I have plenty to share. I want everyone in. And I am ready to invest myself as much as I can to reach this goal.

48 years ago, the Wall was constructed. 20 years ago, its material representation removed. It is time to remove its immaterial leftovers!!”

A few people did help with the speech and I would like to thank Joe Litobarski for pointing me in the direction of a few articles on this area, my good friend Sean for reading over the speech and pointing out all my mistakes, and of course to Hélene and Cécile in Alliance Franciase du Cork for asking me to speak and for all their help!

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The Flower of Identity

Pink Flower, Oxalis Weed Macro
Image by cobalt123 via Flickr

In Luxembourg as part of the training with the Anna Lindh Foundation we had to write a list of things that we think identify us. One suggestion was to draw a flower and on each petal write one thing. I of course am useless at drawing so decided to write a list.

So how do I see myself?

The first things that came to my mind was European, the next was Irish and after that Gay came into my mind. Then the fact that I was Male reared its head. After that I was stumped.

Now I didnt want to seem superficial so I tried really hard to come up with more, so Political came to mind. Then Adventerous and Outgoing popped up. Religous also came to mind as did Blogger After that it was tough going.

Even now two weeks after the training I find it hard to come up with more. Ones that do are Stubborn, Caring, and Smart.

How to others see me?

I decided to see how others saw me, so I asked on twitter, facebook and MSN about people saw me. I got the following back:

  • Friendly
  • Caring
  • Up Beat
  • Outgoing
  • Helpful
  • Headstrong
  • Opinionated
  • Political
  • Intelligent
  • Someone who stands up for what they Believe in
  • A good friend
  • Sexy (I am not making it up!!)
  • Nice Guy
  • Listener
  • Values debate and diversity
  • Principled
  • Respectful
  • Smart
  • Gay

Why do this?

After asking a friend, a conversation ensued about why I was doing this and was their a difference in how I saw myself and how others saw me. To me the big difference was no one mentioned nationality. Which was strange cause if was the first thing I thought of when asked the question about myself as it forms part of who I am and therefore how I act. That was the huge difference.

In Luxembourg after we wrote this out we all went to another room and sat on the floor. One of the trainers Xavi called out different categories about how we saw ourselves and for one of them I was one of two people standing. That category was “Sexual Orientation”. To me started off the questioning that led to this blog post, am I placing too much emphasis on it. The fact that someone else mentioned it, kind of puts my mind at rest.

At the same time I was overwhelmed at the response given to me. I simplfied where I could what my friends said down to one word where possible. It is strange when your friends can come up with more ways of describing you then you can.

But thats Identity thats Personality!

One thing I noticed even while doing this was how fluid Identity and Personality are. To me they are not mutually exclusive. This excercise proves that in most ways except in the area of nationality which I have already dealt with.

So is nationality what actual divides us from stangers, as we don’t see it as part our friends?

Do try this yourself and see personally how you describe yourself, draw it as a flower or a list. It will surprise you.

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Lá Fheile Pádraig Sona Daoibh!

I hope you are all enjoying your St. Patricks Day. I for one have spent most of the actual day in bed. I had to get up early this morning and bring the Macoaimh (Cub Scouts) to mass. So I went back to bed afterwards.

So whats the point of this post? I was going to do a post like this but then decided, why should I be posting about that on what is our National Day as well as being Lá na Gaeilge?

We Irish have a stereotype, of being drunk on St. Patricks Day, but something the priest said at mass today had me thinking. Today is day we celebrate the acheivments of forefathers, the acheivments of the Irish Nation, which we we can be proud of. Ireland can stand tall has a modern, diverse country. It is progressive and (slowly but surely) moving forward. While he went on a bit about religion and faith (I zoned out, the boys must thing Im an awful heathen but Im not bothered) I couldnt get those points out of my head. Why are we as a nation going out and getting drunk on a Tuesday? We have work tomorrow people! Let us instead look at teh acheivements of our ancestors and think, right if thay can do that, we can do more!

Cheannaigh mé Buntás Cainte Cuid a hAon agus Cuid a Dó sna Eason de hAoine seo caite agus tá sé ar fheabhas! Foghlaim a lán rud a fágach mé i na bliana seo caite. I do recommend it for people who want to learn a smattering of words that can be used everyday day! It does need updating though as it goes on about Pounds, Shillings and Pence!

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My Use of Irish – Úsáid na Gaeilge

Salachar MadraíImage by jimmycurn via Flickr

Today those on twitter and Facebook would have noticed a rise in my use of Irish online. This is due to two things. One is catching a bit of Ryan Tubridy on Saturday Night where they were encouraging people to use Facebook as Gaeilge and my last two Facebook Updates have been as Gaeilge. The second is my radio listening. This morning I tuned into Raidio Rí Rá and mentioned that on twitter and guess what? They engaged with me on twitter (Anseo agus anseo).

Now we all know of Raidio na Gaelteachta and its boredom inducing programing (for me it is anyway) and it basically does not encourage young people to use Gaeilge. Raidio Rí-Rá on the other hand is a great change and uses Gaeilge is a fun way and I must say I loved listening to it during my breakfast this morning. While I didnt understand everyword said, I caught the idea of what the presenters were saying and I think it will be my station of choice in future. I think it is only on FM for Seachtain Na Gaeilge but hopefully it will be for much longer, mar tá sé ar fheabhas!

Tá Raidio Rí-Rá ar fhail i Baile Átha Cliath (100.3FM), Corcaigh (106.7FM), Gallimh (99.1FM) agus Luimneach (105.5FM). Tá Raidió Rí-Rá ag craoladh ar-líne 24 uair a chloig sa lá 365 freisin.

I hope to increase my use of Irish on the internet, so watch out for #gael tweets and Facebook updates as Gaeilge from me!

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Póst ar corr as Gaeilge

Bhí mé ag eisteacht le “Top 40 Óifiguil ne hEireann” ar REDFM ar maidin agus chuala mé cúpla amhrán atá mé i ngrá le! Tá siad “Sex on Fire” le Kings of Leon (ag uimhir a dó)

Bhí mé ag damhsa le mo chairde leis an amhrán seo agus le na amhrán ar aghaidh “So What” le Pink

Tá siad ar fheabhas agus bain mé a lán taitneamh as ag damhsa le na amhrán seo!

(Okay enough crappy Irish, but at least I try!)

Friday Poetry Reflection, May 16th


Today for my Friday Poetry rubic, as Faoiseamh calls it, I have chosen a poem that my mother sent to me and it is a really nice poem. Incidently I get to see my parents for the first time in five months today so all excited!

So back to the poetry, the poem is an Irish poem, but I will post it in English also. The Poem is by Padraic Pearse and is called “Bean Sléibhe ag Caoineadh a Mhac” and in English it is called “A Woman of The Mountain Keens Her Son


Click to enlarge

English Translation:

Grief on the death, it has blackened my heart:
lt has snatched my love and left me desolate,
Without friend or companion under the roof of my house
But this sorrow in the midst of me, and I keening.

As I walked the mountain in the evening
The birds spoke to me sorrowfully,
The sweet snipe spoke and the voiceful curlew
Relating to me that my darling was dead.

I called to you and your voice I heard not,
I called again and I got no answer,
I kissed your mouth, and O God how cold it was!
Ah, cold is your bed in the, lonely churchyard.

O green-sodded grave in which my child is,
Little narrow grave, since you are his bed,
My blessing on you, and thousands of blessings
On the green sods that are over my treasure.

Grief on the death, it cannot be denied,
It lays low, green and withered together,—
And O gentle little son, what tortures me is
That your fair body should be making clay !

This is my Mothers favourite poem, she says it reads better in Irish and I have to agree, though as its old Irish, compared to what I learned at school (I didn’t do Peg, thankfully) it dosen’t make much sense. The English on the other hand is still excellent and really does convey that sense of loss that must rack any Mother when a child dies. I love the way the poet can mak the birds sing “sorrowfully” as to most people birds songs are joyful. I suppose nature can always seem sympathetic to us humans if we interpret it with our moods.

What are your thoughts on the Poem?

GaelScoileanna

I am a great supporter of GaelScoileanna, and wish I could speaker better Irish. I do speak irish but only completely langers when my brains starts thinking in Irish and I have to translate to English (or the little bit of German I have, via English) from the irish in my head.

So why am I blogging about the Irish Language. Well firstly cause I actually miss it, yes I didnt think I would, but it turns out I do miss the irish language. And secondly a blogpost. Specially this post over at Maria Horans blog. She has raised a few interesting points on sending Kids to Gaelscoileanna Why do it if your not able to help as a parent. I was lucky I suppose, I enjoyed learning Irish, actually learning the language and not learning poems and prose off by heart, which is what happens with the Irish Leaving Cert Cycle, and I had a mother who was hugely interested in Irish History and the Language. She was always able to help when me or my sister needed help.

Now I didnt go to a GaelScoil, but I kind of wish I did. Strange how nostalgic one gets about a native language when abroad, even when you rarely hear at home.

Over here I have met a few Irish people on nights and only one of them could speak Iirsh. That kind of disappointed me, one of the advantages we were always told in BunScoil (Primary School) was that we would be able to talk to each other as gaeilge in the UK and the Brits wouldnt understand us. My father used this logic in a different way to get out of trouble in France, he just recited the ‘Ar nAthair’, without the ‘Amen’ of course while waving his Irish passport.

I think it is a pity that people don’t make an effort to speak Irish yet send their kids to a gaelscoil and then can’t help their kids with the homework, I just do get it….

Public Information About the Proposal to Amend Article 29 of the Constitution

This motion is being layed before the House today persuant to section 23
of the Referendum Act 1994. It is as follows

The Twenty-eighth Amendment of the Constitution Bill 2008 proposes-

(a) to insert the following subsections after subsection 10º of section 4 of Article 29 of the Constitution:

’10° The State may ratify the Treaty of Lisbon amending the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty establishing the European Community, signed at Lisbon on the 13th day of December 2007, and may be a member of the European Union established by virtue of that Treaty.

11° No provision of this Constitution invalidates laws enacted, acts done or measures adopted by the State that are necessitated by the obligations of membership of the European Union referred to in subsection 10° of this section, or prevents laws enacted, acts done or measures adopted by the said European Union or by institutions thereof, or by bodies competent under the treaties referred to in
this section, from having the force of law in the State.

12° The State may exercise the options or discretions provided by or under Articles 1.22, 2.64, 2.65, 2.66, 2.67, 2.68 and 2.278 of the Treaty referred to in subsection 10° of this section and Articles 1.18 and 1.20 of Protocol No. 1 annexed to that Treaty, but any such exercise shall be subject to the prior approval of both Houses
of the Oireachtas.

13° The State may exercise the option to secure that the Protocol on the position of the United Kingdom and Ireland in respect of the area of freedom, security and justice annexed to the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (formerly known as the Treaty establishing the European Community) shall, in whole or in part, cease to apply to the State, but any such exercise shall be subject to the prior approval of both Houses of the Oireachtas.

14° The State may agree to the decisions, regulations or other acts under—

  • i Article 1.34(b)(iv),
  • ii Article 1.56 (in so far as it relates to Article 48.7 of the Treaty referred to in subsection 4° of this section),
  • iii Article 2.66 (in so far as it relates to the second subparagraph of Article 65.3 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union),
  • iv Article 2.67 (in so far as it relates to subparagraph (d) of Article 69A.2, the third subparagraph of Article 69B.1 and paragraphs 1 and 4 of Article 69E of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union),
  • v Article 2.144(a),
  • vi Article 2.261 (in so far as it relates to the second subparagraph of Article 270a.2 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union), and
  • vii Article 2.278 (in so far as it relates to Article 280H of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union),

of the Treaty referred to in subsection 10° of this section, and may also agree to the decision under the second sentence of the second subparagraph of Article 137.2 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (as amended by Article 2.116(a) of the Treaty 1referred to in the said subsection 10°), but the agreement to any such decision, regulation or act shall be subject to the prior approval of both Houses of the Oireachtas.

15° The State shall not adopt a decision taken by the European Council to establish a common defence pursuant to—

  • i Article 1.2 of the Treaty referred to in subsection 7° of this section, or
  • ii Article 1.49 of the Treaty referred to in subsection 10° of this section,

where that common defence would include the State.

(b) to delete the following subsection from section 4 of Article 29 of the Constitution:

’11º The State may ratify the Agreement relating to Community Patents drawn up between the Member States of the Communities and done at Luxembourg on the 15th day of December, 1989.’.

2. IF YOU APPROVE of the proposal, mark X opposite the word YES on the ballot paper.

3. IF YOU DO NOT APPROVE of the proposal, mark X opposite the word NO on the ballot paper.

4. 4. A copy of the Bill can be inspected or obtained free of charge at any Post Office

The Irish Version:

1. Is é atá beartaithe leis an mBille um an Ochtú Leasú is Fiche ar an mBunreacht 2008-

(a) na fo-ailt seo a leanas a chur isteach i ndiaidh fho-alt 10º d’alt 4 d’Airteagal 29 den Bhunreacht:

’10° Tig leis an Stát Conradh Liospóin ag leasú an Chonartha ar an Aontas Eorpach agus an Chonartha ag bunú an Chomhphobail Eorpaigh, arna shíniú i Liospóin an 13ú lá de Nollaig 2007, a dhaingniú agus tig leis a bheith ina chomhalta den Aontas
Eorpach a bhunaítear de bhua an Chonartha sin.

11° Ní dhéanann aon fhoráil atá sa Bhunreacht seo dlíthe a d’achtaigh, gníomhartha a rinne nó bearta a ghlac an Stát, de bhíthin riachtanais na noibleagáidí mar chomhalta den Aontas Eorpach dá dtagraítear i bhfoalt 10° den alt seo, a chur ó bhail dlí ná cosc a chur le dlíthe a d’achtaigh, gníomhartha a rinne nó bearta a ghlac an tAontas Eorpach sin nó institiúidí de, nó comhlachtaí atá inniúil faoi na conarthaí dá dtagraítear san alt seo, ó fheidhm dlí a bheith acu sa Stát.

12° Tig leis an Stát na roghnuithe nó na roghanna a fheidhmiú a shocraítear le hAirteagail 1.22, 2.64, 2.65, 2.66, 2.67, 2.68 agus 2.278 den Chonradh dá dtagraítear i bhfo-alt 10° den alt seo agus le hAirteagail 1.18 agus 1.20 de Phrótacal Uimh. 1 atá i gceangal leis an gConradh sin, nó a shocraítear faoi na hAirteagail sin, ach beidh aon fheidhmiú den sórt sin faoi réir ceadú a fháil roimh ré ó dhá Theach an Oireachtais.

13° Tig leis an Stát an roghnú a fheidhmiú chun a áirithiú, i ndáil leis an bPrótacal maidir le seasamh na Ríochta Aontaithe agus na hÉireann i dtaca leis an limistéar saoirse, slándála agus ceartais atá i gceangal leis an gConradh ar Aontas Eorpach agus leis an gConradh ar Fheidhmiú an Aontais Eorpaigh (ar a dtugtaí an Conradh ag bunú an Chomhphobail Eorpaigh tráth), go scoirfidh sé, go hiomlán nó go páirteach, d’fheidhm a bheith aige maidir leis an Stát, ach beidh aon fheidhmiú den sórt sin faoi réir ceadú a fháil roimh ré ó dhá Theach an Oireachtais.

14° Tig leis an Stát aontú leis na cinntí, leis na rialacháin nó leis na
gníomhartha eile arna ndéanamh-

  • i faoi Airteagal 1.34(b)(iv),
  • ii faoi Airteagal 1.56 (a mhéid a bhaineann sé le hAirteagal 48.7 den Chonradh dá dtagraítear i bhfo-alt 4° den alt seo),
  • iii faoi Airteagal 2.66 (a mhéid a bhaineann sé leis an dara fomhír d’Airteagal 65.3 den Chonradh ar Fheidhmiú an Aontais Eorpaigh),
  • iv faoi Airteagal 2.67 (a mhéid a bhaineann sé le fomhír (d) d’Airteagal 69A.2, leis an tríú fomhír d’Airteagal 69B.1 agus le míreanna 1 agus 4 d’Airteagal 69E den Chonradh ar Fheidhmiú an Aontais Eorpaigh),
  • v faoi Airteagal 2.144(a),
  • vi faoi Airteagal 2.261 (a mhéid a bhaineann sé leis an dara fomhír d’Airteagal 270a.2 den Chonradh ar Fheidhmiú an Aontais Eorpaigh), agus
  • vii faoi Airteagal 2.278 (a mhéid a bhaineann sé le hAirteagal 280H den Chonradh ar Fheidhmiú an Aontais Eorpaigh),

den Chonradh dá dtagraítear i bhfo-alt 10° den alt seo, agus tig leis freisin aontú leis an gcinneadh faoin dara habairt den dara fomhír d’Airteagal 137.2 den Chonradh ar Fheidhmiú an Aontais Eorpaigh (arna leasú le hAirteagal 2.116(a) den Chonradh dá dtagraítear san fho-alt 10° sin), ach beidh aontú le haon chinneadh, rialachán nó gníomh den sórt sin faoi réir ceadú a fháil roimh ré ó dhá Theach an Oireachtais.

15° Ní ghlacfaidh an Stát cinneadh arna dhéanamh ag an gComhairle Eorpach chun comhchosaint a bhunú-

  • i de bhun Airteagal 1.2 den Chonradh dá dtagraítear i bhfoalt 7° den alt seo, ná
  • ii de bhun Airteagal 1.49 den Chonradh dá dtagraítear i bhfoalt 10° den alt seo,

i gcás ina mbeadh an Stát san áireamh sa chomhchosaint sin.’, agus

(b) an fo-alt seo a leanas a scriosadh as alt 4 d’Airteagal 29 den Bhunreacht:

’11º Tig leis an Stát an Comhaontú maidir le Paitinní Comhphobail a tarraingíodh suas idir Ballstáit na gComhphobal agus a rinneadh i Lucsamburg ar an 15ú lá de Nollaig,1989, a dhaingniú.’.

2. MÁ THOILÍONN TÚ leis an togra, cuir X os coinne an fhocail TÁ ar an bpáipéar ballóide.

3. MURA dTOILÍONN TÚ leis an togra, cuir X os coinne an fhocail NÍL ar an bpáipéar ballóide.

4. Is féidir cóip den Bhille a iniúchadh nó a fháil saor in aisce in aon Phost-Oifig.

——
Source:
RIAR NA hOIBRE – ORDER PAPER, Déardaoin, 3 Aibreán, 2008 – Thursday, 3rd April, 2008